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BRANZ publications provide practical building and design advice on many topics. You can buy these from the BRANZ Shop in hard copy or electronic formats. You can also download our online learning modules and catch up with past BRANZ seminars.

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265 results - showing 21 to 40.

Module: Properties of moisture

The structure and behaviour of moisture can help us understand why a house is having weathertightness issues and how to design to avoid those issues. Weathertightness issues in houses can lead to health problems, financial headaches and structural worries.

Topics covered in this self-paced module:

  • Why is moisture important to understand?
  • What form does HO take?
  • How does it behave?
  • Library of useful material

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Earthquake bracing demand

An earthquake can create massive forces that put a building under great load. Calculating the demand that is placed on a particular building in the event of an earthquake is critical to designing and building bracing within the building so that it performs structurally.

Topics covered in this self-paced module:

  • Earthquake bracing demand factors
  • NZS 3604 tables
  • Calculating bracing demand
  • Scenarios
  • Library

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Cavities

This module focuses on the concepts and features critical to the design of cavities in buildings.

Topics covered in this self-paced module: 

  • What are drained and vented wall cavities?
  • Why are cavities important?
  • How do cavities work?
  • How should a wall cavity be designed?
  • Library of useful materials

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Introduction to H1

Building Code clause H1 Energy efficiency sets performance standards for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and promotes sustainable development.

Topics covered in this self-paced module:

  • What is H1?
  • Why is H1 important?
  • What do I need to know?
  • What method should I use?
  • Library of useful materials

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Building control system

This module looks at New Zealand's building control system, which is designed to ensure safe and suitable housing is built in New Zealand. This system is based on the Building Act 2004 and its subsequent regulations and codes.

Topics covered in this self-paced module:

  • Building Act
  • Building Code clauses
  • Design
  • Building consent
  • Code Compliance Certificate

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Head flashings

This module focuses on the concepts and features critical to the design of window and door head flashings in buildings.

Topics covered in this self-paced module: 

  • What are head flashings?
  • Why are they important?
  • How do they work?
  • Library of useful materials 

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

Module: Introducing bracing

Forces from wind and earthquakes place demands on a building. These demands are calculated for a particular building so that the building can be designed with enough bracing capacity to resist the demand and perform structurally.

Topics covered in this self-paced module:

  • Wind bracing
  • Earthquake bracing
  • Library

Gain 100% in the test at the end of the module, and you'll receive a record of your completion that can be submitted as part of your CPD activity log.

LCAQuickV3.4.2

This is the full working version of LCAQuick, which calculates environmental impacts based on the data you enter. If you wish, you can use LCAQuickV3.4.2 Data Entry initially to sort and enter your data.

This version of LCAQuick is a 55 MB file, so it is best to use it on a reasonably powerful computer. Due to the size of the file and the numbers of calculations that are performed, it can be slower. Please ensure that you are using Microsoft Excel from 2016 or later.

LCAQuick is a free tool developed by BRANZ that helps architects, designers and structural engineers make sustainable design decisions. It evaluates the carbon footprint and other environmental impacts of a building design. It can be used by anyone with an interest to understand the environmental impacts of buildings across the life cycle. 

BRANZ CO₂NSTRUCT

BRANZ CONSTRUCT provides embodied carbon and energy values for building materials, including concrete, glass, timber and metals, as well as products such as bathroom and kitchen fittings and lifts.

Embodied carbon is the amount of greenhouse gases, expressed as carbon dioxide equivalents, required to produce a material. Embodied energy is the amount of energy consumed to extract, refine, process, transport and fabricate a material or product (including buildings). This is provided as a total and divided into energy from non-renewable and renewable sources.

This datasheet is provided as part of BRANZ's development of the New Zealand whole-building whole-of-life framework.

Build magazine - 1 year subscription (6 issues) plus any new bulletins produced

12-month subscription to Build magazine (6 issues) plus all new BRANZ bulletins produced in that 12-month period.

$123.00
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Bulletins - 1 year subscription (12 hard copy bulletins)

Two bulletins are published bimonthly and provide good-practice guidelines on a wide range of building and building performance topics.

Build magazine - 1 year subscription (6 issues)

Published bimonthly, Build magazine is a subscription-only industry magazine offering up-to-date advice and information on a wide range of building-related issues.

BU649 Corrosion of metals in New Zealand buildings

Corrosion is a chemical or electrochemical reaction between a material and aggressive substances in its surrounding environment. The interaction normally leads to the material being consumed and a reduction of performance, durability and/or visual attractiveness. A common example of corrosion is the rusting of steel, which converts the metal into compounds such as oxides, hydroxides or sulphides.

The economic cost of corrosion is enormous. One New Zealand estimate put it at the equivalent of 2.5% of gross domestic product (GDP) or around NZ$7.5 billion, while another put it at NZ$9 billion. International studies have estimated the annual cost of corrosion as the equivalent of 2-6% of GDP. 

This bulletin gives an overview of the corrosion of metals in New Zealand buildings and explains how corrosion can be reduced and managed. BRANZ scientists have researched corrosion for over 40 years, and much of the content in this bulletin reflects their findings.

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BU648 Timber shingle and shake roofing

Timber shingles and shakes have been used as a lightweight roof cladding in New Zealand for around 200 years. They are mentioned in current design guides for many heritage areas, but they are also found in contemporary styles of housing.

Shingles are sawn, have relatively smooth faces and usually have random widths and taper in thickness. Shakes are usually hand split (although some are also sawn) and usually have a rougher textured surface on at least one side. Widths are generally random. 

Shingles and shakes are usually manufactured from residual timber left over from the main forest log production. They have a relatively small carbon footprint compared to some other roofing materials.

This bulletin outlines the selection, design and installation of timber shingle and shake roof cladding. It updates and replaces BRANZ Bulletin 443 Timber shingles and shakes.

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BU647 Recessed downlights (luminaires)

LED technology has undergone significant changes in the past few years, making them an energy-efficient and cost-effective form of lighting as recessed luminaires. Retrofitting LED lamps into existing fittings can be done, but a better option may be to replace the luminaire.

This bulletin describes the classifications of recessed luminaires, their legislative and installation requirements and the range of lamps available. It replaces Bulletin 539 Recessed downlights.

This bulletin covers:

  • legislation
  • recessed luminaire classifications
  • installation requirements generally
  • lamps
  • replacing lamps
  • transformers.
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BU646 Floor levelling compounds

Floor levelling compounds are used to correct minor imperfections and variations in strip and sheet flooring and concrete floors. This bulletin outlines the generic types of floor levelling compounds available, the substrates they can be applied to and guidance on preparing and applying them.

This bulletin updates and replaces BRANZ Bulletin 360 of the same name.

This bulletin covers:

  • specifying floor levelling compounds
  • product types
  • preparation
  • compound application
  • topping slabs.

 

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BU645 Installing timber strip flooring over timber joists

Poorly installed timber strip flooring can result in problems such as cupping, warping, buckling and squeaking of boards. The main causes of problems are installing flooring before the building is fully enclosed, high moisture levels, boards of insufficient thickness and joists too far apart.

This bulletin describes the requirements for installing timber strip flooring over timber suspended floor framing and outlines finishing options and maintenance requirements. It replaces Bulletin 390 Laying timber strip flooring over timber joists.

This bulletin covers:

  • subfloor framing
  • timber flooring
  • installing timber strip flooring
  • floor finishes, cleaning and maintenance.
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BU644 Solid timber strip flooring on a concrete slab

Solid timber strip flooring is a popular flooring for both domestic and commercial buildings. Traditionally, timber was installed over suspended timber subfloor framing but is now commonly specified as an overlay flooring over a concrete slab.

Poorly installed timber strip flooring can result in problems such as cupping, buckling and popping of boards. Common causes of problems include: 

  • the moisture content of the concrete slab being too high or insufficient moisture vapour barrier protection when the timber flooring is installed, resulting in moisture uptake and swelling of the timber
  • the moisture content of the flooring timber not matching the moisture content of the internal space at the time of installation, resulting in expansion or contraction of the boards.

This bulletin replaces Bulletin 506 Laying solid timber strip flooring on concrete slabs.

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BU643 Energy efficiency in New Zealand houses

BRANZ has carried out a House Condition Survey of New Zealand houses approximately every 5 years since 1994. The 2015 sample of 560 houses was broadly representative of the national housing stock and included both owner-occupied and rental houses. The survey comprised an on-site physical house assessment, a telephone interview with the occupants and an appliance use questionnaire completed by the occupants. 

The survey found big opportunities for improving the energy efficiency in New Zealand houses. Improving energy efficiency has numerous benefits, from financial savings for households through to reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

This bulletin covers:

  • space heating systems and appliances
  • space heating habits
  • thermal insulation
  • glazing
  • water heating systems
  • lighting and appliances
  • residential electricity consumption
  • regulatory changes around energy efficiency
  • key opportunities for improvement.
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BU642 Changes in the condition of New Zealand houses over 25 years

Before the first BRANZ House Condition Survey (HCS), there was no regularly collected, in-depth data on the state of our houses. As far back as 1935, the government had recognised the importance of house condition on New Zealanders' lives and acknowledged the need to collect information on it.

BRANZ set out to uncover the physical condition of a sample of randomly selected New Zealand houses, with trained assessors using objective criteria. The survey also allowed calculation of the level of maintenance and repairs required and estimated the cost of those repairs. The HCS provided an important new source of information for policy making. It has also helped BRANZ researchers to understand the performance of different building materials and to target further research.

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